a life of fibre

Archive for the ‘Felting’ Category

My little helper

Sunday, June 17th, 2018

Puck loves to be with me and today she was desperate to be very close.

The only problem is the bit I need to work on next is now under her bottom and I don’t like disturbing her!

It’s a dyeing day

Friday, June 8th, 2018

I love the effect of hand dyeing but I can’t honestly say that I really enjoy the process itself. It usually starts out all right but before I finish I find myself wishing I’d never begun. Today is different, this is all I’m doing and it’s been blessedly short in the doing.

The autumn orange colours are for a project I’ll tell you about in Autumn, I know, crazy huh? Me working so far in advance!

The Felted Mill

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

Wool Stories – The Felted Mill, is an exhibition by region 10 of the International Feltmakers Association inspired by Leeds Industrial Museum, Armley Mills. It opened in April and will be running until October 21st, if you can find the time to visit, do as it’s well worth it with work from twenty one felt makers on display. Below is a selection of work from the exhibition but not all of it, there’s so much more to see.

From a distance I saw an owl but closer up there is so much more to see. The owl is taken from the Leeds crest outside the museum, it has wings of cogs and is standing on A and M printing blocks which stands for Armley Mills. It has elements of printed film posters and is a Visual Wowl by Tracey Gaytor, isn’t it wonderful?

Window of Inspiration or Limitation is by Anthea Green, it incorporates a number of British wools and was influenced by the similarities between women working at the mill in it’s heyday and the work of women in Laos now.

Cogs in the water by Jane Gatenby is particularly apt as the mill is bounded on one side by the canal and on the other by the river as well as being formerly driven by water power.

Also inspired by the machinery is this beautiful work by Margaret Jackson containing nuno felting and stitch. The colours are so interesting on this piece.

Anne Corder was inspired by rust and rivets to make this jacket. The rivets are what really drew my attention, they have a pleasing rhythm to them that works well with the line of the jacket.

I love a bit of texture so this cog pot by Iris Brunton ticked my boxes. I love how the cuts both reveal the inner layers of wool and the inner pot to form the cog, really well done.

It was nice to see my own work mounted there too even though I couldn’t get a picture of these without my shadow and the lights reflecting off the glass.

My thanks to the hanging committee for their inspired choice of hanging this piece of mine in front of a light source. It really helps to show up the embroidered words.

Inspired by all the books of fabric samples at Armley Mills, Jill Lauriston made a felt book and very ingeniously used an old shuttle for the spine.

I failed spectacularly to get a shot of the full 3 foot of  Linda Hume’s mill chimney but I’m pleased to show you the pictures of mill workers she incorporated which added such poignancy. The text was also printed at the mill using one of the printing exhibits.

This depiction of machinery by Helen Riddle is created using free hand motion sewing. It’s fascinating to watch Helen ‘draw’ with a sewing machine and I love this black and white pitcure, the only item in the show, besides mine, which is monochrome.

This is a page from Helen Riddle’s sketchbook and it stole my heart.

This nuno felted, dyed and printed jacket from Chloe Greenwood is fantastic. It’s called Hard Times and contains quotes from some of the former mill workers. Check out the buttons.

I hope this has whetted your appetite to go see the whole show. A perfect time to go would be on Saturday 2nd June when the Leeds Wool Festival is on.

Upcycling

Friday, May 4th, 2018

I love upcycling, don’t you? I also love making book covers so I was very pleased when I came across a damaged vintage silk scarf and decided to nuno felt it into a book cover. These photos don’t do it justice, they really don’t but they’re the best I’ve got and I wanted you to see this pretty book cover.

It really wasn’t a scarf I’d ever have worn but remodelled like this I love it.

I left the little clusters of flowers to speak for themselves and did a small amount of hand embroidery on just three of the larger flowers.

The best news is, I have sufficient left for a second one 🙂

Wool Stories – The Felted Mill

Sunday, April 15th, 2018

Yesterday morning was the opening of the exhibition down at Leeds Industrial Museum, Armley Mills. If you recall my posts from earlier in the year when I talked about my involvement in the project, you’ll realise it’s been nearly a year in the making. There’s work from 21 felt makers, covering 2d and 3d work inspired by the mill, it’s contents or environs.

Is it a scarf?

Thursday, April 12th, 2018

Well, it was meant to be. I had some lovely broad french lace which I thought of using for a nuno scarf. Carefully laying out the wool, I added the lace on one side and dyed silk laps on the other and began rolling. Stopping part way to check how it was progressing, I decided I really didn’t like it and promptly ripped the wool from the lace setting it aside as a pre-felt I could come back to later.

Ripping the wool off whilst it was wet meant it stretched and pulled it, it looked quite good, I began to have thoughts of using it as a collar on a pot, hmm….

 

To begin, I made a basic white pot on a resist and took it to the pre-felt stage with the resist moved. Using about half the scarf length I began pleating and tacking it in place before recommencing felting.

I really like all the chunky texture around the opening contrasting with the plain pot.

Really pleased with how it turned out and I still have half the prefelt and all of the lace leftover for another project. Should I bead the collar??

Vintage style book cover

Friday, April 6th, 2018

In my stash was a damaged vintage silk scarf which I thought it was time to use. I laid it onto a background of white Blue Faced Leicester wool and felted it to make a book cover.

It worked out even better than I had hoped and will shortly make it’s way into Out of the Ordinary in Skipton.

‘Wool’ pot

Sunday, April 1st, 2018

I had a little bit of printing left after my Armley Mills pieces were made and felt inspired to make a pot with them.

You can see I’ve cut round the shape of the letters, the plan being to shape the rim of the pot in the same way.

The word is repeated on the other side too but in a different font and true to form, I forgot to take another photo during laying out.

This huge O and fancy L are my favourite letters. The font on the other side was so large it was difficult fitting it all on.

I used silk paj printed and felted onto Blue Faced Leicester. I did consider embellishing the pot but wasn’t sure and allowed myself to be convinced to leave it plain. Sometimes less is definitely more.

Moorfield School Part 2

Wednesday, March 28th, 2018

Having the scale plan on the wall allowed the students to see what we were working towards.

We began by making all the prefelts ready to cut into shapes for the buildings.

The wall plan was useful for tracing the outline of the building sections preparatory to cutting out. Using a white prefelt for the background, we could then start laying on the pieces.

Building it up piece by piece.

Three main colours were chosen for the building – pink, purple and yellow with red for the roofs. Orange was chosen for the new part of the building and grey with sparkly angelina fibres for all the windows.

Time to start adding detail.

Down to work. Working in teams to roll both with hands and then feet.

It was worth all the work.

It’ll be hung by the means of tabs on the top edge. You’ll notice these aren’t evely spaced so that if, in future, the school would like to hang it as a triptych it’ll be a simple process of cutting it into three.

The students were a pleasure to work with and this may have been a large project but it was fun.

Moorfield School Part 1

Wednesday, March 21st, 2018

I’ve been very lucky over the years to work regularly with Moorfield School in Ilkley and was invited back again this month. Each time I liaise with the teacher to see what the subject will be dependent upon what’s being studied  and we’ve done everything from local scenes to poppy memorials.

The teacher thought we should do a local landmark like the cow and calf rocks and I thought perhaps we could do it in pop art style. We were looking to produce a wall hanging for in a stairwell and my next idea was that we produced a picture of the school and as I love Friedensreich Hundertwasser, we’d be inspired by his colourful style.

Now, who wouldn’t be inspired by this building? My plan was to have the children make prefelt which we could cut into the various shapes to construct the building. It would all be done in bright colours and with lots of pattern.

You can’t just turn up and hope it goes to plan, it needs advance work for which I need to thank Hubby for the time he spent on the floor drawing a scale plan with me.

Large isn’t it? The finished felt will be 1.5m wide by 75cm tall and of course we needed to start larger. It was quite a project.