a life of fibre

Archive for the ‘Past workshops’ Category

Textured pots

Wednesday, May 16th, 2018

I love texture so it should be no surprise that I love the work of the two ladies I was privileged to teach yesterday. Both are made from Shetland wool, the white one is mine which I’ll show you a better picture of later, there’s too much sun in these.

The paler is Shetland with blue Swaledale balls added  and two frills and the brown is Shetland with red Blue Faced Leicester balls and Wensleydale curls.

The blue has a quietness to it whilst the red is quite ‘look at me’ but I absolutely adore them both.

Nuno scarf workshop

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

I ran a nuno scarf workshop last Friday. Everyone began with white silk gauze and white Merino but the results are very different. Enjoy…

Didn’t they do well!  Thanks to Claire and Kath for modelling their scarves. I’m also very grateful for all the help I had in tidying up at theend of the day – thank you x

Felted vessels workshop

Wednesday, February 21st, 2018

I ran a felt pot workshop last Saturday, it was a good day in many respects. the sun shone all day and warmed the room we were working in, the people on the workshop were friendly, eager to work and have a laugh and they made some fabulous pots, especially the newbie felters.

We began by forming felt around a small vase and went on to free form a second vessel afterwards. Both were made from British wool and adorned by various silks, all available from Adelaide Walker (of which I’m a partner). People were encouraged to try a different wool each time. The results were stunning as I’m sure you’ll agree.

You can see bits of hand dyed Swaledale and Blue Faced Leicester adding more colour to the pots. Sadly the silk doesn’t shine too well when wet. Thanks for a great day everyone and for the help in clearing away, I was home in record time!

The next pot workshop is on Tuesday 15th May where we progress to adding lots and lots of texture. I’d love to see you there.

WSD Workshop

Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018

On Saturday I was lucky enough to run a workshop for the Bradford Guild of Handweavers, Spinners and Dyers who meet at the Bradford Industrial Museum. It’s a really nice light space and the guild are so welcoming. If you fancy popping along and meeting them their meetings are held on the 3rd Saturday in the month and I highly recommend it as a great way to spend a day.

Anyway, my task was to teach a nuno scarf workshop and it was ace! Looking at my pictures afterwards I’m not sure I captured them all (the end of workshops always seems hectic) but most are here for your delight.

We were working on silk chiffon and using Blue Faced Leicester wool with Wensleydale fleece plus various silk and plant fibres for shine and interest.

There are so many options for laying out the design/wool e.g. extending beyond the silk, covering part or all of it that I thought it would be helpful to take away some of the angst by working solely in white. Plus, of course, there’s expertise in the guild should anyone decide to dye theirs afterwards!

It was a good decision as people did indeed have a lot to think about and some stunning designs and ideas came our of the workshop. Working in white helped to focus attention on the process and I’m sure everyone could now go away and repeat the nuno felting at home.

As you can see, there was also quite a variety of shapes for the ends of the scarves as some trimmed away silk and / or extended beyond it.

How lucky was it to have a black towel to show off this snowflake and icile fringe design scraf?

I can see I’ll have to recommend people bring dark towels in future as they’re such a good backdrop. On Friday 13th April I’m running a nuno scarf workshop in Otley, West Yorkshire and you can book direct here.

British wool book covers

Friday, April 28th, 2017

Piles of Masham, Blue Faced Leicester and Shetland wool turned into five smashing book covers.

We included lace, natural and synthetic fabrics and dyed Teeswater curls onto the fibre. At the pre felt stage we stopped and stitched into it before continuing to felt.

In the photo above you can see the broken lines of navy stitch which were put in at the pre felt stage and have sunk into the background as opposed to the cross stitch which was done after felting was completed and which floats on the surface.

Again, the pale pink stitches done at the pre felt stage have become part of the background whilst the stitching added later stands proud. I love the layering and effects that can be achieved by stitching at two stages in the felting process.

Beautiful, hard wearing British wool note books. Another successful day 🙂

 

Aha! the photos have been found

Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

At last, I’ve found the photos from the wet felted vessels workshop last month. We were working in British wools and if I remember rightly the ones chosen were Shetland, Masham and Blue Faced Leicester. The idea was to make two smaller pots to get a feel for how different wools behave.

They’re cute aren’t they, we then went onto our second ones in which people made larger ones and played with the shape.

All the shapes above come from a circular resist.

They look really great as a group, everyone did really well with the pots. One or two have silk on but it doesn’t shine when wet, more’s the pity.

Picture workshop

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

A couple of pictures from yesterday’s workshop to share with you.

This one by Anne was still in the making and the soap is obscuring the colours somewhat but I bet it’ll look great once it’s dry.

Margaret was working from a photo and wanted to know how to bring more life into her work by using relief and working with pre felts. It was coming together quite nicely and I know it will be transformed with more relief work and stitch before we next see it.

This was Angie’s first picture, worked from a photograph and quite successful. Another one destined to be stitched into!

Jackie brought in a black and white photo of a landscape reflected in water to work from. It’s come out very well and the silk added to give greater lightness to the piece is just beginning to shine as it dries.

Catch up one

Sunday, March 26th, 2017

I’m back playing catch up on my posts again! I seem to have a few weeks where they’re flying off the keyboard and then time runs away with me in other areas of my life and the posts roll to a halt.

I was hoping to show pictures from the wet felted vessel workshop but they seem to have disappeared from the camera. I suspect Hubby may know something about this. If they turn up I will share them here but in the meantime you’ll have to make do with a few pics from the bag workshop earlier this week.

All the bags are worked in Shetland wool and all but one of the workshop participants were compete felting newbies. The end of the day turned into a terrible rush as just as we were taking photos the next group turned up to use the hall half an hour early. There’d been a mix up in the admin and our bookings were overlapping so we had to shoot round and tidy up very quickly which meant photos were rushed and not all bags were on the photo above.

The light areas in the photo above is the silk which was just beginning to shine as it dried and this bag was made by Mary.

Steph is responsible for the bag shown above, it was her first day felt making and was paid for by her son as a Mother’s Day present – wasn’t that a nice thought.

I loved the way Karen decided to frill the edge of her bag flap, it really suited the decoration on the bag too. I must thank all the ladies for their speedy work in helping me to clear up and pack away tables etc. I don’t think I’ve ever been out of there in such quick time but the youngsters were waiting for their dancing lesson.

Last workshop of the year

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

Fittingly, it was a felt wreath workshop, a busy but very productive and successful day. The hall was trimmed for the festive season which added to the ambience.

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The misteltoe wreath below is by Zoe and the addition of the robin with the red breast enabled her to use a red ribbon for hanging. That little flash of red amongst all the green and white works very well.

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Next up is from Suzi. This wreath is very calm with it’s colour choice and yet the spirals give it such energy. Try as hard as she might, the  wreath resisted all attempts to have any extra bits added so all the shop bought lovelies, with the exception of one small bark bird, stayed in their bags! Perhaps they’ll make it onto the next one. The hanging mechanism is a handmade cord made from handpsun yarn.

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On first sight I wasn’t won over by the face on the little brd brought in by Claire but Oh the tail!!  You have to love it for the tail. Roses in bright red, maroon with red sparkle angelina and old gold Merino.

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Mandy worked in a similar colour palette but added white roses to the mix which worked very well. I also like the way the spirals have been arranged into a fan creating a real strong focal point.

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Lynne (I hope I’ve spelt this correctly, please forgive me if I haven’t) wanted a wreath that was quite simple and unfussy so although there’s a lot of items on here their placement has achieved the look she was after. Again, the one flash of red lifts it and allowed her to use a red hanging ribbon.

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I asked what colours people wanted to work in on the wreath as I needed to card the fibre in advance and did wonder what a purple wreath would look like. Well, I think it’s stunning. Rachel did a fantastic job with her colour combinations and despite or maybe because of  her angst over colours, placement of items and how much to put on, it all worked very well.

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Francesca also surprised me with her colour choice by asking for teal but went on to add that she would put red and orange roses with it which I knew would be a stunning colour combination. Turning up with a large bag full of baubles  enabled her to choose a good mix of colours and there were plenty of the appropriate size for the wreath. This wreath is glorious fun!

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Mainly, people need to be encouraged to put more on a wreath, everyone remembers the adage less is more but sometimes more is more. You don’t need to cover the whole wreath but where you do place items they need to look abundant. There’s something about wreaths, I definitely need to make one for our shop and am now planning another workshop in my head.

Thanks ladies for a brilliant day and thanks very much for help with tidying away, have a great Christmas.

Poncho workshop

Friday, November 18th, 2016

Don’t ask me to recall which poncho belonged to whom, it’s a few weeks ago and I’m sorry to say I have forgotten!  I could perhaps describe one or two people but as to names, well, that is a weakness of mine. Howver, that doesn’t detract from the work put in nor the beauty of the outcome. Enjoy 🙂

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Did you notice that they’re reversible and that the one above is a beautiful dark chocolate colour on the reverse?Two people chose to leave them as oversize scarves and they do look rather cosy that way.

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We’d begun the day by salt and pepper dyeing of the silk chiffon.

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Whilst waiting for the silk to dye some people chose to spend the time making prefelts which were then applied over the silk side of the poncho. It adds weight as well as interest.

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So sorry I didn’t get these up earlier ladies so that I could have named the creator of each one.