a life of fibre

Posts Tagged ‘vessel’

Textured white pot

Monday, July 10th, 2017

Just a quick catch up to show you the white pot now it’s finished and dry.

Sadly I didn’t manage to get a picture of the textured interior and this one is definitely going to be stitched into so keep an eye out for the next post.

Masham pot

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

This is another of the samples I made for the British wool vessel workshop I ran last week. Masham is a lovely wool to work with and I, most unusually for me, decided to decorate the pot with pattern!ย  I don’t know what came over me and I actually found it quite fun.


It’s been s struggle to get anything like half way decent photos and these don’t do it full justice but I can wait no longer to show it to you. The pattern was varied around the pot and used lines and circles, very simple but also very effective.




I used two shades of Masham – fawn and mid brown. You need to see the underneath of the pot too


Quite possibly my favourite view of the pattern if not the potm Much as I enjoyed it I found myself wishing for more texture so perhaps my next one should be both patterned and textured ๐Ÿ™‚

Fungal pot

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

What inspires you? On this occasion it was fungus that did it for me, the type you see growing straight out from trees.

My version is made from Jacob wool with the fungus in Blue Faced Leicester wool.

It’s worked out quite well but I would make larger fungus next time, not too large or it wouldn’t be in scale with the pot. We almost saw blue sky this afternoon so I dashed home to take a few photos but the cloud was already back! Never mind, you’ll get the general idea. So much grey sky recently that decent photos seem to happen only in my imagination.

Having said that, perhaps I should just make a larger / very large pot and have loads of fungal growths. What do you think?



Wool vessel workshop

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

I’m running a British wool pot workshop on Thursday 2nd March at Clifton Village Hall, Otley. We’ll make two small pots during the course of the day, one moulded around a bottle or jam jar and one moulded free form. We’ll be using the seamless resist method which is a standard method for most 3D work.

There’ll be a number of British wools to choose from including; Shetland, Blue Faced Leicester, Cheviot, Jacob, Manx Loaghtan, Whitefaced Woodland, Swaledale, Herdwick and Wensleydale. It’s an abosrbing and fun workshop, you’ll love it.

The cost is ยฃ50 per day, which runs from 10am – 4pm, and includes all fibres and equipment. All you’ll need to bring is an old towel and a packed lunch. Bookings can be made direct here or to pay by cheque please call me on 07745 160090

Textured vessel workshop

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

I always look forward to workshops, to seeing what people make but, on the day, some workshops seem to have a really good feel about them that makes them stick in your mind as a good one. This workshop was one of those, great atmosphere and I just loved what people made. It’s a fab feeling to think I helped them to achieve such brilliant results, especially as two were new to felt making.


Unusually, I took a couple of shots during the laying out process and the one below is my absolute favourite, so pretty.


In the flesh it looked like a most delicious cake! The monotone below also caught my attention., I was drawn to it’s curly exuberance.


I just had to show you this one again, finished, with the lace on the bottom which reminded me of a potters’ mark.


And a full frontal of it!


The next two were made by new felt makers and, for me, the red one has a romantic feel, love the vibe.


What can I say, purple and orange are one of my favourite colour combinations, I was always going to love this.


It’s hard to believe at times that every one of these pots came off the same shape resist. It’s about where you cut and how you shape. This next one really did have the feel of an underwater scene so scalloping the opening was perfect.


The ‘cake’ somehow became less cake and more vintage as it was felted and the plain white second opening really helps to set it off.



Sadly people weren’t willing to leave their creations with me ๐Ÿ™ I guess I’ll have to make my own.

Dual purpose pot

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

In an earlier post I showed some dyeing I’d been doing that I intended to use on some Midsummer Night’s Dream inspired work. I began this pot by carding up lots of browns with a little grey and black for the interior of the pot, I wanted it to be dark and not detract from the exterior.


Midi continued to oversee my work, it’s nice to have company. For the two external layers I carded up lots of green, all of the carded wool was from my bit bag so it was using up fibres at the same time ๐Ÿ™‚



There is: bits of broken skeleton leaf, silk, scrim, synthetic fabric, bits of hessian, silk fibres, mulberry silk bark and Teeswater curls all hand dyed.



Lots of texture all way round.



To become one of my pieces for Midsummer Night’s Dream this is just the start but in the meantime it will serve a dual purpose and become a sample for the textured vessels workshop on 30th April. Once I’ve worked on it further I’ll show it again.

Skeleton Leaf Vessel

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

In the past I used skeleton leaves on a wall hanging but decided it was time to play with them on 3D work.On 30th April I’m running a workshop exploring vessels with surface texture and this will be one of my samples.

I began by laying out 4 fine layers of Merino in the usual way and then placed five of the skeleton leaves on top.


You need to leave a gap between the leaves as that will close up as the wool felts. My trusty helper Midi oversaw all work.


Off the resist and beginning to shape it with my mini and rounded palm washboards. Essential that you use a net to protect the leaves during work.


I’d hoped for a sunny day and some outside shots to show it off instead, you’ve got inside on a damp and grey day – sorry.



Not sure that you can tell in this shot but it’s aย  soft pentagon shape, rather lovely even if I do say so myself. You’d expect that the leaves would break with all the rolling and rubbing but it hasn’t been my experience. Top tip – leave the leaves soaking on the wet wool before commencing work and always use a net to prevent breakages. Next workshop Saturday 30th April – vessels with surface texture.


Vessel workshop

Sunday, February 28th, 2016

Last month was the vessel workshop where we had a great time making pots from British wools including; Blue Faced Leicester, Manx Loaghtan, Jacob and Wensleydale.


They look particularly pleasing as a group don’t you think? The blue colour is dyed BFL. We all began with a circular resist yet you can see the variety of shapes achieved from that same simple beginning. It’s one of the great pleasures of workshops that people produce such variation from the same start point.


The red is dyed BFL and the blue is hand dyed Swaledale. With the second set of pots we worked on producing a resist for felting around vases and jars. Again, it’s the grouping that makes it so pleasing. It’s fun to make two in one day, one free formed and one around an object plus, it was an opportunity for everyone to try two separate wool types.

Every sheep breed produces different wool and it’s one of the many joys I get from felting is to play and experiment with the different wools. There are more pots coming up in April with opportunities to add fabrics, spikes, cut backs and cut through to our work. Check out the workshop page if you fancy coming along.

Surface texture vase

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

This sweet little pot was made a couple of weeks ago from Jacob and Teeswater wools.

It was made using a basic circular resist with a felt ball hidden in the layers that I then cut back to reveal.


The interior is turquoise Merino and there’s hand dyed Teeswater around the edge of the pot.


On the three front fins there’s also a thin line of turquoise Merino.


It underwent various shapes during felting as I played around with the final shape. This final shape was the most pleasing and I can even see this as a hanging pod. It was fun experimenting with extrusions and textures and there’ll be a lot more of this in my textured vessels workshop on 30th April.

Bergschaf vessel

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

I read about Bergschaf wool and how people liked making felt with it so when we got some in at Adelaide Walker I jumped at the chance to try it. Bergschaf is an Austrian sheep, 30ย  micron, short staple with a good crimp and comes in a carded batt. To be honest the wool has more vegetable matter in it than I’d like but I was ready to give it a go.


On Saturday 9th May I’m runningย  a vessel workshop at Wharfe Wool Fair so I thought I’d kill 2 birds with one stone by trying out the Bergschaf and making a sample at the same time.


As it’s a carded wool batt it’s very quick and easy to lay out which will make it easier for any new felters. I laid out two layers on each side and finished with some tussah silk on the centre top. It wasn’t very long before it was ready to come off the resist, another plus for anyone new to felting.


It’s quite a hairy wool which you can see has worked it’s way right through the silk but it makes a splendid vessel and was very quick to felt. Now it’s dry you can feel just how sturdy the felt is, I really rather like it and it’ll mkke beautiful hard wearing bags too. There’s still a few places on the workshop on Saturday if you’d like to come and try out this technique and this wool.