a life of fibre

Posts Tagged ‘woven scarf’

A little bit of weaving

Thursday, January 18th, 2018

I’m managing to do a bit of weaving now and then, not as much as I’d like but then I am busy with felt making for an exhibition coming up at Armley in April. Below are my latest woven scarves.

Woven on my rigid heddle loom with a 7.5 reed. The orange scarf has the same warp and weft but the blue one has 2 shades of a denim colourway yarn with the paler being used for the warp. I was quite pleased with the blue one and my edges are definitely improving, the orange one however, I was bored and just wanted to finish it so I rushed. It’s perfectly serviceable but I’m really not keen. At least I learnt from it and made the next scarf more intesresting.

I’m ery pleased with this one. The warp is two colours of aran weight acrylic yarn from my stash and the weft is a fine yarn which I bought from a charity shop and have no idea what it is, just that I liked it.

I love the way it turned out and as I no longer beat the weft down so hard they’re even quite soft! The lesson learnt this time, to start chellenging myself more with colours and patterns and not just the plain weave. Wonder if I’ll do that?


My first woven scarf

Tuesday, March 7th, 2017

We bought the loom just before Christmas and as Simon was first to start weaving I had to wait my turn. It’s a 20″ Ashford knitters loom, which is basically a rigid heddle loom that folds up. The folding up part was important to us as with two spinning wheels in the house space is at a premium.

It’s difficult to know what it will turn out like especially as how firmly you beat each row down will make a difference. There are occasions on which I’ll produce samples but when it’s just for fun I like to make a whole item. Things I learnt making this first scarf – 1) warping up was faster than I expected   2) the tension needed to be greater than expected  3) it was easier to beat the rows down using both hands to hold the reed  4) if you don’t get your tension even in the beginning you can feel the difference in the work  5) make the warps longer as you lose some length during weaving and when cutting off at the end   6) it was way quicker than I expected!!   I really liked that last learning point 🙂

It’s far from perfect but I learnt a lot, was much better at keeping my edges straight than I expected to be and the result is still beautiful and usable despite any errors. I can’t wait to have another go but I’ll have to as Simon is now on his third item. Think we both may have the bug.